Event

Work Won’t Love You Back on Season of the Bitch

do u love ur job??? RLY?! ……….????? Well guess what, as kellen says, she’s just not that into you (she meaning the hellscape that is labor under capitalism). this week we have our incredible friend, labor journalist, and author, Sarah Jaffe on the pod to talk about her new book Work Wont Love you Back. […]

Event

Love and Class War on Delete Your Account

Roqayah is off this week, so Kumars is joined from the top of the hour by independent labor journalist Sarah Jaffe, reporting fellow at Type Media Center, cohost of Dissent Magazine’s Belabored podcast, and the author of two books: Necessary Trouble: Americans in Revolt, and a new book out now from Hurst and Bold Type Books, Work Won’t Love You […]

Event • Los Angeles

Background Briefing with Ian Masters

I was on Background Briefing with Ian Masters, talking about Work Won’t Love You Back as well as my latest Nation feature and the debate over reopening schools.

Event • London

I Am Not My Work at Novara FM

There are two people by whom I’ve been excited to be interviewed about Work Won’t Love You Back since I was writing the damn thing. One of them is James Butler at Novara FM, and it’s up. 

Event • Los Angeles

Virtual Event: Skylight Books with Raj Patel

Sarah Jaffe and Raj Patel join us to discuss Work Won’t Love You Back: How Devotion to Our Jobs Keeps Us Exploited, Exhausted, and Alone (Bold Type Books)

*Please note: this event will take place live on Crowdcast. RSVP here to join the livestream or watch the replay!

Event • Seattle

Virtual Event: Town Hall Seattle with Kathi Weeks

In conversation with professor Kathi Weeks, and with support from her book Work Won’t Love You Back: How Devotion to Our Jobs Keeps Us Exploited, Exhausted, and Alone, she examines the “labor of love” myth–the idea that some work is not really work, and should be done out of passion rather than pay. In a deeply-reported examination of this culture, told through the lives and experiences of workers in various industries, Jaffe reveals her belief that we have all been tricked into buying into a new tyranny of work. From the unpaid intern, to the overworked teacher, to the nonprofit worker, and even the professional athlete, she makes the case that the labor of love myth is a recipe for exploitation. In a conversation that is more imperative than ever as the lines between home and work blur to an indistinguishable degree, she asserts that understanding this dynamic will empower us to work less and to demand what our work is worth. And once freed from those binds, we can find out what actually gives us joy, pleasure, and satisfaction.